9/11 Memorial Trip: Remembering 8:46 and 9:03 A.M.

View across the south pool of the National September 11 Memorial” by NormanB (CC-BY-SA-3.0)
Of the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, Sophomore Cody Sobel said “the outside fountains were amazing and seeing the inside of the memorial is a sight to behold.”

The LRHS History Club went on a field trip to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City on December 4, 2018.

Mr. Joe Sciancalepore, co-adviser to the History Club, spoke to the Ledger about the significance of the trip to the students. He said, “I think the significance lies in the close proximity both geographically and chronologically to a foreign attack on American soil. I can teach my students about the attack on Pearl Harbor, but all that I know about it is from what I have read or heard. The attack was almost 80 years ago and 5,000 miles away. 9/11 was up close and personal. It was in our backyard; you could see it from Skyline Drive. It was less than 20 years ago and many of our neighbors were affected personally by the attack. I think our students understand these things and hopefully will eventually want to understand the circumstances leading up to the attack.”

The trip was a good opportunity to raise students’ awareness on the subject. It can be a touchy and emotional subject for some, but when asked if students took it well, Mr. Sciancalepore stated, “I thought they did. These students were too young to remember the actual attack, so I believe to them it was a learning experience about a historical event. As for myself, I remember the feelings of shock, sadness and eventual anger of that day as I am sure most who were of a certain age at the time of the attack would feel.”

Students who went on the trip had good reactions and took away new knowledge and understanding of the attack. Sophomores Aiden Berkenbusch and Cody Sobel were asked about the trip. When asked whether the trip was humbling or thought provoking, Sobel stated, “I believe it was thought provoking due to how the buildings fell and how much power you need to make something so strong fall.” Clearly, this shows that the trip was successful in making students really think about 9/11.

“It was beautifully done, and it was stunning to see how much was done to pay respects to the lives lost.”

— Cody Sobel, sophomore

The thoughtfulness behind the memorial also impressed students. Berkenbush stated, “The museum was so well put together and really helped people understand what happened. It portrayed the day by having articles, documents, and even audio of the air traffic control in the planes.” To add to this, Sobel told us, “It was beautifully done, and it was stunning to see how much was done to pay respects to the lives lost. The outside fountains were amazing and seeing the inside of the memorial is a sight to behold.”

A very notable feature of the memorial is the fountains mentioned by Sobel. There are two of them placed exactly where the foundations of the Twin Towers used to be. Around the sides of both are panels which display the names of every single person killed in the attack.

Though it has already been stated several times in several ways, the monument deserves all this recognition. It is an impressive monument which may bring out the tears of many who visit it, and educate the rest.